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card review Necklace of Silver and Pearls

Card Review
Necklace of Silver and Pearls: click to enlarge
Necklace of Silver and Pearls

Card text:

Hoard item. Discard this card to give +3 direct influence and +5 mind to bearer until the end of the turn. The bearer's additional mind does not use any controlling influence. This item may also be so discarded during opponent's site phase.
"'I beg of you,' said Bilbo, stammering and standing on one foot, 'to accept this gift!' and he brought out a necklace of silver and pearls that Dáin had given him at their parting."-Hob

  • Card Number: TD020
  • Rarity: Common1
  • Card Type: Resource Item
  • Alignment: Hero
  • Artist: Audrey Corman
Necklace of Silver and Pearls
written by patrick Premium Member LV31
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A one shot Hoard minor item. Seems to not be worth the three slots in your deck, right?

Not necessarily so. This card is a reactive spoiler: it makes influencing the bearer by your opponent much much more unlikely to succeed. Arwen and Celeborn are stymied in their recruiting efforts of Aragorn and Galadriel, at least for a turn. The problem with this card is that it is reactive, meaning it sits passively until employed then vanishes after that single use.

Getting the card into play:
This item suffers from the hoard restriction. This means that if you need this card on key characters, you will either need to camp out at Tharbad or use Cup of Farewell or Armory. Otherwise, you run the risk of having to decide between a greater/major hoard item and this item, as your company may be tapped save one in getting to the site and entering the site. Framsburg is only useful if you are going there to recruit Fram Framson. To make Framsburg like Tharbad in its ability to unearth minor hoard items requires many more cards: Rebuild the Town, Fireworks, and a way of recycling Fireworks.

Many of us have the uncommon dwarven rings. The MPs are the same as for the rare dwarven rings, and you are less likely to have someone else play the ring before you can. With the dwarven rings of Thelor's or Thrar's Tribe, you can maximize the turn efficiency part of your minor item extraction from your deck, producing three results: you reduce your deck size thereby increasing the likelihood of getting the other cards when you need them; you can select the order in which you excavate the items; you have the option of one or two per turn as long as you have any left in your deck or in your discard pile. The fact that these two rings permit you to go after discarded items means you can discard minor items at will, knowing you can get them back with ease.

Another drawback is that it gives a point of CP.

Alone, Necklace of Silver and Pearls is not a reason to use Enduring Tales, but if you are use ET as a strategic deck manipulator, then you get the additional benefit. Beware, you should employ ET for minor items only if you plan on playing it in the same turn you discarded it, otherwise you are impeding the cycling of your hand, which will most often result in game loss because you lost sight of your strategic goal.

It was pointed out to me after a previous CotD (#483) that Necklace of Silver and Pearls is another card which boosts a character's mind attribute, the other being Palm to Palm. The result is your character is less likely to be Seized by Terror or be affected by the Faces of the Dead. Necklace is better in some aspects than Palm to Palm, as its boosting of a character's mind does not demand more controlling influence points. Also, the increase in mind makes Neeker-breekers less likely to tap out characters you need; though using Necklace in this fashion would be a mark of either shortsightedness or desperation.

So, Necklace of Silver and Pearls can serve as a foil to several hazard strategies: company (and fellowship) breaking, resisting a Dragon's Terror, influencing away a character, and recruiting attempts. Because it can be used during your opponent's turn, Necklace is worth consideration if you are playing Aragorn or Galadriel and do not want them to jump ship.

Ohtar

Original card review taken from : http://fan.theonering.net/morgulrats/
With the authorization of the webmaster.

The reviewing team consisted of Gwaihir (Chris Farrell), Gimli (Nathan Bruinooge), Ohtar (Charles E. Bouldin, Esq.), Radagast (James Kight), Joshua B. Grace (Beorn), Martijn Steultjens (Fram Frumgarson), Jason Klank (Saruman) and Jeffery Dobberpuhl (Wormtongue)

 

Modified on July 16, 2011 10:34 pm



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Author Message
duff6551
LV45 United States send message

Avatar for duff6551
Member since
November 15, 2002
Subject:    Posted: July 16, 2011 10:34 pm Reply with quote Report content icon

a common card with a lot of drawbacks but little advantages - might be useful in specific decks but not for the fainthearted
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